Maths on YouTube

With up to 75% of young people aspiring to become a YouTuber, it has got to be worth introducing your classes to some of the best maths channels on YouTube.   Most teenagers spend a lot of time watching videos online, so they might as well get inspired by some great mathematics. 

There are lots of videos which will help show your pupils how to solve a particular question, or understand a certain topic.  However when we think of YouTube there are also videos which are really fun, perhaps quirky and often covering mathematics which is outside of the curriculum.  Videos which are perfect for the end of a lesson, for a maths club, or perhaps for your brightest students who want to know about the universe of maths which isn’t covered at GCSE.

YouTube maths videos can feature international experts, as well as crazily passionate maths enthusiasts who can inspire your pupils.  Find your favourites and then share them as much as you can.      

Note: The IMA is not responsible for any content posted on these YouTube Channels (obviously)!  Watch any video fully (to the actual end) before sharing it with your class (it’s just common sense). 

Top Maths YouTube Suggestions (of the fun, quirky and inspirational kind, not the exam solution kind) in no particular order:

Katie Steckles

Katie is a fantastically passionate mathematician.  Check out Katie’s favourite number the Megiston

Numberphile

One of the best known maths channels on YouTube. Their most popular video has had 16 million views and covers how to cut a birthday cake mathematically

Stand-up Maths (Matt Parker)

If you haven’t seen Matt Parker in real life during his stand-up maths shows, then check out his YouTube Channel.

Hannah Fry

Hannah Fry has presented the Royal Institution Christmas Lectures and has even featured in a BBC documentary called Contagion which predicted a pandemic before it happened. Search her name on YouTube and you could start by watching How to Catch a Serial Killer using maths.  She is also an Associate Professor of Mathematics at UCL.

Jordan Harrod

It might not be directly maths related but Jordan’s channel covers the use of AI in everyday life.  If AI is changing the world and AI is powered by maths, then this is definitely an interesting channel.

3blue1brown

This YouTube channel is run by a Stanford educated mathematician Grant Sanderson and focuses on explaining mathematics using amazing visualisations. Many are quite advanced, so could really suit A Level students.

Vi Hart

Vi Hart combines maths and art in a format which is actually too difficult to describe if you have never seen one of her videos. Here is her video about Fibonacci spirals which are found in nature. 

The Map of Mathematics

If you want to blow the minds of your pupils then show them this video which attempts to chart the whole of mathematics in one single video.  

If you have other suggestions, then we hope that you will share them with your fellow Scholars – we could never put together a fully comprehensive list and so the hope is that this will just be a springboard for you to find some fantastic videos.